Kimberley national parks and parks

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    PURNULULU NATIONAL PARK FEATURES THE BREATHTAKING BUNGLE BUNGLE RANGE: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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    THERE ARE OTHER SPECTACULAR NATURAL ATTRACTIONS IN PURNULULU NATIONAL PARK, SUCH AS CATHEDRAL GORGE: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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    THE WALLS OF WINDJANA GORGE RISE ABRUPTLY FROM THE WIDE ALLUVIAL FLOODPLAIN OF THE LENNARD RIVER, REACHING ABOUT 100 METRES HIGH IN SOME PLACES: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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    TUNNEL CREEK NATIONAL PARK HAS WESTERN AUSTRALIA'S OLDEST CAVE SYSTEM: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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    ANOTHER FASCINATING PLACE IS WOLFE CREEK NATIONAL PARK, WHICH HAS THE SECOND LARGEST CRATER IN THE WORLD - THE WOLFE CREEK METEORITE CRATER: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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    MIRIMA 'HIDDEN VALLEY' NATIONAL PARK FEATURES SPECTACULAR ROCK FORMATIONS AND IS POPULAR FOR BUSHWALKING, SIGHTSEEING AND PHOTOGRAPHY: Photo courtesy of Tourism Western Australia
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National parksKimberley national parks and parks

Purnululu National Park
(including the Bungle Bungle Range)

The Bungle Bungle Range, in Purnululu National Park, is one of the most fascinating geological landmarks in Western Australia. From an aircraft, the Bungle Bungle Range is an imposing sight. The orange and black stripes across the beehive-like mounds, encased in a skin of silica and algae, are clearly visible as you approach from the south. As you sweep further over the range a hidden world of gorges and pools is revealed, with fan palms clinging precariously to walls and crevices in the rocks.

Although the Bungle Bungle Range was extensively used by Aboriginal people during the wet season, when plant and animal life was abundant, few Europeans knew of its existence until the mid-1980s. The area has been a national park since 1987 and its unique appearance has captured the public imagination. The park offers a remote wilderness experience. In 2003, its beauty was recognised globally when it was inscribed onto the World Heritage List.

Activities

Bushwalking (hiking), photography, scenic flights over the Bungle Bungle's by helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft are available within the park or from Halls Creek.

Camping

There is camping available in the park.

Location

109 km north of Halls Creek.

Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation

Geiki Gorge National Park

Geikie Gorge National Park is one of the most easily accessible national park in the Kimberley and is located just 20 km from Fitzroy Crossing. Geikie Gorge is situated at the junction of the Oscar and the Geikie Ranges. The mighty Fitzroy River has carved a 30 metre deep gorge into the remains of the ancient limestone barrier reef that existed here in the Devonian period.

During the wet season, the Fitzroy River rises about 16.5 metres, staining the walls of the gorge and flooding the entire national park. In the dry season, between April and November, the river transforms itself into a quiet stream strung out beneath the towering cliffs of the Devonian reef.

Geikie Gorge National Park is a day use park only. Camping is not allowed. You can explore the park on several walking trails or join one of the boat cruises.

Activities

See ancient limestone reef system, aboriginal heritage, bird life, fruit bats, freshwater crocodiles. sightseeing, photography, walking, nature observation, boat cruise.

Camping

There is no camping available in the park.

Location

20 kilometres from Fitzroy Crossing.


View Geiki Gorge National Park in a larger map
Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation

Windjana Gorge National Park

The walls of Windjana Gorge rise abruptly from the wide alluvial floodplain of the Lennard River, reaching about 100 metres high in some places. The 3.5-kilometre long gorge cuts through the limestone of the Napier Range; part of an ancient barrier reef, which can also be seen at Geikie Gorge and Tunnel Creek National Parks.

The Lennard River runs through the gorge in wet weather, but during the dry season it forms pools surrounded by trees and shrubs.

The deep, moist soils of the riverbank support the tall broad-leaved leichardt tree, native figs and the paper-barked cadjeputs. These trees also provide shelter from the hot sun for many waterbirds, a colony of fruit bats and a large group of corellas. Freshwater crocodiles can often be seen in the pools.

Activities

See the ancient barrier reef system, limestone gorge, natural water pools, fruit bats, freshwater crocodiles, bird life, sightseeing, bush walking (hiking), photography, nature observation.

Camping

There is camping available in the park.

Location

145 kilometres from Derby.


View Windjana Gorge National Park in a larger map
Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation

Tunnel Creek National Park

Western Australia's oldest cave system, in Tunnel Creek National Park, is famous as a hideout used late last century by an Aboriginal leader known as Jandamarra. He was killed outside its entrance in 1897.

Tunnel Creek flows through a water worn tunnel beneath the limestone of the Napier Range, part of the 375 to 350 million-year-old Devonian Reef system. You can walk 750 metres through the tunnel to the other side of Napier Range, wading through several permanent pools and watching for bats and the stalactites that descend from the roof in many places. At least five species of bat live in the cave, including ghost bats and fruit bats, and stalactites descend from the roof in many places.

Freshwater crocodiles are occasionally found in the pools. Take a torch, wear sneakers and be prepared to get wet and possibly cold.

Activities

Cave exploration in WA's oldest cave system, stalactytes, Aboriginal history, sightseeing, bushwalking (hiking) and photography.

Camping

There is no camping available in the park.

Location

115 kilometres from Fitzroy Crossing.


View Tunnel Creek National Park in a larger map
Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation

Wolfe Creek Crater National Park

On the edge of the Great Sandy Desert and the extensive spinifex grasslands of the East Kimberley lies the Wolfe Creek meteorite crater, the second largest crater in the world from which fragments of a meteorite have been collected. The crater is 880 metres across and almost circular. Today, the floor is about 60 metres below the rim, and is generally flat, but rises slightly in the centre. The porous gypsum found in this central area supports reasonably large trees and contains a number of sinkholes that may reflect the position of stress fractures formed by the impact from the meteorite. The crater is also inhabited by a variety of wildlife.

Activities

Bushwalking (hiking), sightseeing, photography, viewing the crater rim is a must. Another spectacular way to view the crater is to take an aerial flight from Halls Creek.

Camping

There is camping available in the park.

Location

145 km from Halls Creek.


View Wolfe Creek Crater National Park in a larger map
Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation

Mirima "Hidden Valley" National Park

Mirima National Park, on the outskirts of Kununurra, has spectacular rock formations. Mirima is the name given to the area by the Miriuwung people, who still live in the region and consider this area to be especially significant to their culture. It is also aptly known as the "Hidden Valley". The park is a day use area only, popular for sightseeing, walking, photography and nature observation. In daylight, the steep, broken walls of rock come alive as they reflect the tones of changing light.

Activities

Walking, photography, nature observation.

Camping

There is no camping available in the park.

Location

Two kilometres north of Kununurra.


View Mirima National Park in a larger map
Copyright - Government of Western Australia through the Department of Environment & Conservation