Deloraine national parks and parks

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    MOLE CREEK KARST NATIONAL PARK HAS SOME OF THE BEST CAVE SYSTEMS IN TASMANIA: Photo - Geoff Murray, courtesy of Tourism Tasmania. All rights reserved
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    THERE ARE TWO MAIN CAVES WHERE YOU CAN EXPLORE THE FASCINATING WORLD OF 'KARST' LANDSCAPES: Photo - Geoffrey Lea, courtesy of Tourism Tasmania. All rights reserved
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    MOLE CREEK KARST NATIONAL PARK ALSO HAS SOME STUNNING RUGGED SCENERY WORTH DISCOVERING: Photo - Geoffrey Lea, courtesy of Tourism Tasmania. All rights reserved
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National parksDeloraine national parks and parks

Mole Creek Karst National Park

The Mole Creek Karst National Park was declared in 1996 to provide protection for some of the finest and most visited cave systems in the State, including Marakoopa and King Solomons Cave. Both caves are open to the public, and provide the opportunity to take a deeper look into the fascinating world of 'karst' landscapes.

The Mole Creek area is renowned for its caves. Marakoopa and King Solomons Caves are but two caves in an area that contains over 300 known caves and sinkholes. Other typical karst features in this area include gorges and large underground streams and springs.

Both caves are home to a range of fascinating animals that have evolved features which allow them to adapt to their lightless environments. The glow-worm display in Marakoopa Cave is the largest you'll see in any public access cave anywhere in Australia.

For the visitor, the Mole Creek Karst National Park offers a range of activities. Although guided tours of the caves will be high on your agenda, don't miss the opportunity to take a short walk through the beautiful forests in which these caves occur.

Activities

Guided cave tours.

Camping

There is no camping available in the park.

Location

40 minutes drive west of Deloraine.


View Mole Creek Karst National Park in a larger map
Copyright - State of Tasmania through the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment - Parks & Wildlife Service

Liffey Falls State Reserve

It is a matter of considerable argument among Tasmanians as to which is the prettiest waterfall in their State - Russell Falls or Liffey Falls?

Liffey Falls State Reserve is nestled within cool temperate rainforest on the slopes of the Great Western Tiers. Framed by the dominant species of Tasmania's cool temperate rainforests - myrtle, sassafrass and leatherwood, the falls are understandably a popular spot among both Tasmanians and visitors alike. A nature walk leads from a picnic area near the carpark down through forests of towering eucalypts and tree ferns to the falls. A number of smaller falls are passed along the way.

The Liffey Falls State Reserve was included within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area in 1989, a tribute to the globally significant value of the region. The area reveals a rich human heritage and insights into the forces which shaped the landscape over the past 250 million years.

Activities

Bush walking (hiking), Liffey Falls Walk.

Camping

There is no camping available in the park.

Location

Approximately 17 km from Deloraine.


View Liffey Falls State Reserve in a larger map
Copyright - State of Tasmania through the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment - Parks & Wildlife Service